Conversation with an Instructional Designer – Villa Vance

Mountain View College is pleased to introduce Villa Vance, an Instructional Designer from the LeCroy Center, who is providing consultation support twice a month on our campus. Please take a moment to learn more about her, in her own words.

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Please tell everyone what an Instructional Designer is and what types of services and support they provide?

Instructional design (ID) is a broad area for me. Depending on where you work, it can mean different things in every area. But in higher education an instructional designer basically helps with course design. From planning and analysis, design and structuring the flow of the course, management, implementation, and evaluation. But it does not necessarily mean we always start from planning. A faculty and/or staff could come to us, and they may have done all the analysis and planning. Our job then is to help with the design and structure. As an instructional designer for the district at DCCCD we can support faculty and staff with questions about course design, course copy/template, course clean up and management, eCampus/blackboard (from simple questions about adding a syllabus to complex issue about gradebook, eConnect, Quality Matters (QM), etc. We also assist and deliver professional development workshops and presentations.

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What is your professional background and why did you choose this field as a profession?

My undergrad is a BS in Computer Science and I have a master’s degree in Learning Technology with focus in Instructional Systems and Design from University of North Texas. I am also a License Vocational Nurse (LVN) but haven’t practiced for a few years now. Previously, I was an instructional designer for the eLearning Center at Collin College. I also worked for America Online (AOL) in the Philippines back when it was still famous. I stumbled into Instructional Design when I was in nursing school doing my preceptorship. I wanted to combine my computer science degree and healthcare experience and do some training work. But, I didn’t end up in the healthcare, so I chose the next best thing. To add to that, I started working for eLearning in another college and it sort of started my drive to do instructional design.

What does working in higher education mean to you?

Two things: I get to take a holiday when it is a holiday and I love being involved in a community. During my undergrad years I was very involved in my school and I think that’s when it started… somewhere in my subconscious mind, I always wanted to work in a school, so I chose higher education. Seriously, working in higher education is so great because you get to work with diverse people who help mold and share the next generation. It also means that I don’t have to be stagnant. I always need to keep up with my education/professional growth to make sure the faculty/staff I am helping are up to date with current trends.

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What was the very first job you ever had and what skills did it teach you?

My first job was an adjunct faculty. It was the first job offer I got a few months after graduation. If I remember it correctly, I taught computer 101, turbo pascal and another computer languages. And because of the adjunct position, I was hired by another college to teach 3 more courses. It was challenging at first because most of my students were only a few years younger than me (1 to 2 years) and I had one class with only male students. From these two jobs, it taught me to adapt and be flexible with many different types of audiences and/or clients. It also helped in being able to communicate better. I’ve learned how to mentor others and ensure that I am constantly learning as well. I’ve also learn to take risks and be imaginative when it comes to teaching.

What about instructional design is most exciting to you?

What I find really exciting in instructional design is when I get to see the faculty I am helping flourish and be able to take the advice I gave them and use it in their course. Afterwards they’ve come back to me and tell me that it made teaching more fun or how it has a positive effect on their courses and students.

What is your first impression of Mountain View College?

I love it! The environment is very relaxing. And so far, the faculty and staff I’ve met are very nice. I like the location of the college also, tucked away in its own little place.

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What is one thing you’d love to accomplish working with the amazing faculty and staff at Mountain View College?

One thing that I would like to accomplish is to establish a good rapport with the faculty and staff. And hopefully that will open the door to have more engagement, so I can better serve them.

Is instructional design limited to only those who teach in the classroom?

Definitely not. Instructional design can be applied to many different things. For example, if you are looking at a recipe online with step by step process on how to cook something, that particular process was created by someone. In some ways, they had to go through a process to put together the recipe. It may not encompass the hard-core parts and it doesn’t necessarily include all the nitty gritty parts of instructional design, but instruction and design are everywhere.

How should a faculty member prepare for a consultation with an Instructional Designer?

The preparation for a consult with the instructional designer really depends on what the faculty need help with. But the first thing that the faculty or staff need to do is to make sure to set up an appointment with the ID. This will make sure both you and the ID will be prepared because there is some sort of pre-arranged agreement for the appointment.

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If interested in learning more or collaborating one-on-one, what are the next steps one should take?

Let’s chat! Essentially giving us time to collaborate on what you want to do with your course and how I can assist you. This will also give me the chance to meet more of the wonderful staff and faculty of Mountain View College.

If you would like to set up a consultation with Villa, please fill out an ID Consultation Request.

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DCCCD New Employee Orientation

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A Part of the DCCCD Family

What does it mean to me to be part of the DCCCD family? It means everything, of course! The District New Employee Orientation is an opportunity for new or recently hired employees to gain understanding of the District’s view of our educational presence, community value, and commitments to students, the community, and its employees.

It was my pleasure to attend the District New Employee Orientation just recently. It was an exciting opportunity to leave MVC for the day (and that pile of work on my desk), network with new employees across DCCCD, connect with faculty, staff, and administrators and “let my hair down” for the day (dressing casually was a requirement in fact).

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A Full Schedule

George Marquez and staff members had an exciting day planned for us. It started with an introduction from Chancellor Joe May. Throughout the day we participated in group team building projects, watched videos about DCCCD, learned the history of each college, received a word from the “great” Susan Hall, became informed about compression planning, and even participated in fun interactive games.

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DCCCD Strategic Priorities

Most importantly we learned about the four DCCCD Strategic Priorities (they drilled us a few times just to make sure we learned it by heart):

  1. Employee Success
  2. Student Success
  3. Community Engagement
  4. Institutional Effectiveness

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Just the Beginning

This is just the beginning of my journey as a Director of Professional Development. As I continue to learn more across the district and participate in similar events, it will be my pleasure to bring new and exciting practices to our campus, while being respectful of the unique elements that make up MVC.